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Home Remedies For Poison Ivy

27 Jan

Poison ivy is a skin related problem. Common symptoms of poison ivy include skin rashes, redness, itching, blisters and so on. The problem of poison ivy can last for 3 to 4 weeks. Different home remedies can be used to treat the problem of poison ivy. If desired results are not obtained with the use of home remedies, an individual should consult a dermatologist.

Remedies for Poison Ivy

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How to Store Grains for up to 25 years

25 Jan

These are troubling times indeed with economic, climatic, and social upheavals and wild gyrations of every type in every corner of our planet. Although I would not specifically ever rate myself as a “survivalist” I do believe in being prepared for any eventuality: One of the most important factors towards this type of preparation is to ensure that there is an adequate food supply to last out any emergency, whether short- or long-lived.

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Arc Welding with 3 Car Batteries

24 Jan

ORIGINAL POST ON: http://prepforshtf.com/arc-welding-3-car-batteries/#.UQAwkh2YtT0

 3BatteryWelding

Here is a good video I found that shows you how to arc weld with three 12 volt batteries.

This is for an emergency situation, please be very careful if you attempt this!

Batteries can explode attempt at your own risk!

Hot water for free–from the wood cook stove!

22 Jan

Original post from http://sustainablepreparedness.com
One of the most multi-purpose tools on the homestead is a wood cook stove.  Ours not only cooks the food and keeps the house toasty warm; it also heats our hot water!
Wood cook stove range boiler hot water systemThe two main components, aside from the wood cook stove, are a water coil (#6 & #7 on the pictures below) which is a pipe that runs through the fire box to heat the water, and a range boiler (picture on left) which is a large tank that holds the hot water before and after it circulates through the wood cook stove.

Active vs Passive

There are a couple of variations on the “hot water from your wood stove” scene.  One involves the use of an inline electric circulating pump to force water through the water coil; the other uses the simple principle of heat rising to accomplish the same thing.  It is called a thermosiphon system.  “Active” systems (using an electric pump) have some advantages, but in the opinion of this writer, not enough to offset their negatives for most people.  An active system can produce as much as 50% more hot water than a passive (thermosiphon) system, and since more water movement takes place, there is less chance of water overheating and creating dangerous pressure levels.  But anytime you unnecessarily involve a mechanical or electric device in essential systems, you are asking for trouble.  For instance, if electricity is lost during winter, you would have to potentially shut the wood stove down or dismantle the hot water system to prevent dangerously high temperatures and pressures.  And some inline pumps have a poor reputation for reliability.  Even if you are on a renewable energy system with a very efficient DC inline pump, it still uses electricity throughout the day while the stove is running, and that can add up.  Bottom line?  Whenever possible, keep it simple and go with a thermosiphon system!  And that is what we are going to focus on in this post. Continue reading

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When to start seeds-info graphic

17 Jan

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