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How to Store Grains for up to 25 years

25 Jan

These are troubling times indeed with economic, climatic, and social upheavals and wild gyrations of every type in every corner of our planet. Although I would not specifically ever rate myself as a “survivalist” I do believe in being prepared for any eventuality: One of the most important factors towards this type of preparation is to ensure that there is an adequate food supply to last out any emergency, whether short- or long-lived.

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Hot water for free–from the wood cook stove!

22 Jan

Original post from http://sustainablepreparedness.com
One of the most multi-purpose tools on the homestead is a wood cook stove.  Ours not only cooks the food and keeps the house toasty warm; it also heats our hot water!
Wood cook stove range boiler hot water systemThe two main components, aside from the wood cook stove, are a water coil (#6 & #7 on the pictures below) which is a pipe that runs through the fire box to heat the water, and a range boiler (picture on left) which is a large tank that holds the hot water before and after it circulates through the wood cook stove.

Active vs Passive

There are a couple of variations on the “hot water from your wood stove” scene.  One involves the use of an inline electric circulating pump to force water through the water coil; the other uses the simple principle of heat rising to accomplish the same thing.  It is called a thermosiphon system.  “Active” systems (using an electric pump) have some advantages, but in the opinion of this writer, not enough to offset their negatives for most people.  An active system can produce as much as 50% more hot water than a passive (thermosiphon) system, and since more water movement takes place, there is less chance of water overheating and creating dangerous pressure levels.  But anytime you unnecessarily involve a mechanical or electric device in essential systems, you are asking for trouble.  For instance, if electricity is lost during winter, you would have to potentially shut the wood stove down or dismantle the hot water system to prevent dangerously high temperatures and pressures.  And some inline pumps have a poor reputation for reliability.  Even if you are on a renewable energy system with a very efficient DC inline pump, it still uses electricity throughout the day while the stove is running, and that can add up.  Bottom line?  Whenever possible, keep it simple and go with a thermosiphon system!  And that is what we are going to focus on in this post. Continue reading

Delicious Lip Balm Recipe

16 Jan

Makes 1 1/2 ounces

  • 4 tsp grated Beeswax
  • 8 tsp Coconut Oil, melted
  • 6 tsp  Apricot Kernel Oil
  • 7 drops Sweet Orange Oil 
  • 7 drops Lemon Essential Oil
    You can choose any essential oil of your choice to suit your mood….enjoy ! I tend to pick citrus blends because they are so uplifting.

In a double boiler combine:Beeswax
Coconut Oil
Apricot Kernel Oil
Gently melt over low heat until everything is liquid and stir to combine.
Remove from the heat and stir in the essential oils.
Carefully pour into lip balm empty lip tubes and allow them to set up firmly for one hour.

Beeswax Yellow Honeywax Pearls (1 lbs)

10 Black 0.15 oz. Lip Balm Empty Containers

Sweet Orange 100% Pure Therapeutic Grade Essential Oil- 10 ml

 Lemon Essential Oil. 10 ml. 100% Pure, Undiluted, Therapeutic Grade.

Primitive Water Purification Do It Yourself Project

16 Jan

Once you find water, a major issue remains: is it pure? Is it drinkable? And if not, how to make it drinkable?

In today’s world this is a much more complex issue than it was previously. Just 20 years ago in Canada you could still drink water from the streams, rivers, and lakes in the north — for example, in northern Ontario, including northern Lake Huron and the Bruce Peninsula. However, the spread of Giardia in recent years has greatly increased the risk of drinking water straight from these sources.

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Condoms for Survival?

9 Jan

11 Ways A Condom Can Save Your Life: Multi-functional survival uses for a CONDOM.

People have been packing them in mini survival kits for as long as I can remember – using them primarily as an expandable WATER CONTAINER.  Don’t worry, I’ll get into details later.  While a little taboo, I’ll ask that you set aside any preconceived notions you might have about condoms.  In this post, I’ll argue that as far as  multi-functional survival uses are concerned, the condom offers an incredible BANG for your buck.  Sorry – I couldn’t resist.

I’ll break down the many uses within each CORE SURVIVAL CATEGORY.

WATER

As I’ve mentioned, including condoms in survival kits is not a new idea.  They make amazing compact water containers that can hold as much as 2 liters of water if handled properly.  They are, after all, designed to be water tight.  The elasticity of latex condoms is SHOCKING. Continue reading

Homemade Mouthwash

7 Jan

minty mouthwash recipe
1 cup distilled, filtered, or boiled water
2-3 drops peppermint essential oil
Mix together in a clean container. Shake before each use. Do not swallow. Store in a dark cupboard or medicine cabinet. (sunlight causes essential oils to lose their potency)

orange spice mouthwash recipe
1 cup distilled, filtered, or boiled water
3 drops clove essential oil
2 drops cinnamon essential oil
2 drops orange essential oil
1 drop ginger essential oil
Mix together in a clean container. Shake before each use. Do not swallow. Store in a dark cupboard or medicine cabinet. (sunlight causes essential oils to lose their potency)

Rain barrels collection for gardening

2 Jan

Rain barrels collect rainfall and store it, so that it can be used later. There are 3 main components – The roof, the barrel, and the hose. These are not always a roof, barrel, and hose, but those functions will be present in almost every system (collection, storage, and output). A very common setup is to place barrels under gutters and fill watering cans with the water as needed. Our system will use a small awning as our roof (our gardens and barrels are located a bit away from the house), a barrel for each garden bed, and a soaker hose that runs into each bed from the barrel. Here’s how we made the barrels.
Step 1. Procure the barrels. The most important thing about the barrels is that they hold water, and they never held anything bad. In Texas we could get 55 gallon blue plastic barrels from the Coca-cola bottling plant – they were used to transport soda syrup. Up here in North Carolina we got them from an independent farm supply store, and they were used originally to ship pickled Continue reading

Survival Shelter

2 Jan

Survival Shelter

1. Everything can be broke, forced, overwhelmed

“Let them come, I will take down all of them”

Yep, eventually someone will come, and NO sometimes you can not take them down all. You need to accept fact that point of survival is to survive, not to die like hero in big gunfight. I prefer to be living sneaky person who is good at hiding, instead of dead brave hero.

No matter how much time and money you spent in making your shelter impenetrable, everything can be broken and taken, it is just matter of time and enough force. We are talking here about ordinary people who do not have ex. rocket launch silo for shelter.

2. Your shelter can not look different than anything that surrounds it

No matter what kind of shelter we are talking about, be sure that it looks like anything else around it. What that means? There is no sense of doing things to your house in order to make it more secure and then to look very different from other houses in your neighborhood. Continue reading

Homemade Cough Drops and Cough Drop Lollipops

28 Dec

Fall is officially here and with it came the beginning of my family’s cold season. Sigh. I was hoping we wouldn’t get sick quite so soon. However, with three kids and multiple kid filled events per week it was bound to happen.

There is one advantage to getting sick so early in the game; I now have an excuse to start making all kinds of home remedies. Some home remedies make the cut and some don’t but the ones that do I am going to share with you!

Cough drops can be a wonderful thing. Anyone with a sore throat or nagging cough will tell you that they love a good cough drop. The funny thing is that many cough drops are full of ingredients that aren’t good for you. Sugar, food dyes, soy can all be found in common cough drops. Do you really want to be using a cough drop with those ingredients?

The good news is that cough drops are incredibly easy to make! I found the original recipe at Little House in the Suburbs and when I saw someone mention lollipops and idea was born. Naturally kids need cough drops too but I don’t like giving my kids itty bitty pieces of hard candy. Cough drop lollipops are a logical solution. Cough drops on a stick.

Cough Drop Lollipops

½ cup to 1 cup honey (honestly any amount would do probably)

Candy thermometer (optional)

Lollipop sticks

Lollipop mold (although if you do not have a mold you could make free form lollipops by pouring the honey over the stick on a non-stick surface)

Cook-


Pour honey into small saucepan and cook over low heat. Stir constantly and bring honey to a boil. If using candy thermometer, insert in and continue to stir the honey until it has reached a temperature of 300 degrees. Remove from heat and move to test phase. If not using the candy thermometer then continue cooking and occasionally test. Just don’t wait too late to test; testing too early is better then testing too late.

Test –


To make sure your honey has reached the right consistency, place a drop or two of honey into a cup of ice water. If the honey turns and stays hard (like a hard candy) then you are good to go. If it is still soft then you need to keep cooking a bit longer.

Making the Lollipops –


With Molds- Grease lollipop molds and insert sticks so that they are ready in the mold. Pour honey into mold and let cool at room temperature. (No cheating and putting them into the fridge. It won’t work)

Without Molds- Lay lollipop sticks on a greased non-stick surface such as a silicone mat or parchment/wax paper. Carefully pour honey over each stick, creating a free form lollipop.

Making Cough Drops sans sticks-


Instead of making lollipops, you can of course make regular cough drops. You can purchase cough drop molds or any small mold will work. I used my lollipop mold to try out my cough drops and it worked fine. You could also create free form cough drops just like the free form lollipops. Same instructions apply; pour honey into mold or onto a greased non-stick surface and let cool.

Add Ins-


Now just plain honey is great but you can get really creative with these! I have made cinnamon cough drops as well as a ginger variety. I am also interested in trying herbal cough drops my steeping herbs in the honey (you’d probably want to strain the herbs before making the cough drops) Think chamomile, thyme, or mint. I have also heard of using some essential oils such as lemon or menthol. I’d also be curious to see how a dash of elderberry syrup would do in these cough drops. I’ll have to try that out once I make some elderberry syrup.


Note: Babies under the age of 1 year should not be given honey.

PUTTING TOGETHER YOUR OWN URBAN SURVIVAL KIT

25 Dec

Odds are, if things ever get hairy, most of us will be in some sort of urban environment. As such, would it not make sense to build a survival kit ideally adapted to this environment?

An urban survival kit should be geared towards scenarios city-dwellers would most likely run into in an

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